The Art of Critical Pedagogy: Possibilities for Moving from Theory to Practice in Urban Schools

This book furthers the discussion concerning critical pedagogy and its practical applications for urban contexts. It addresses two looming, yet under-explored questions that have emerged with the ascendancy of critical pedagogy in the educational discourse: (1) What does critical pedagogy look like in work with urban youth? and (2) How can a systematic investigation of critical work enacted in urban contexts simultaneously draw upon and push the core tenets of critical pedagogy? Addressing the tensions inherent in enacting critical pedagogy - between working to disrupt and to successfully navigate oppressive institutionalized structures, and between the practice of critical pedagogy and the current standards-driven climate - The Art of Critical Pedagogy seeks to generate authentic internal and external dialogues among educators in search of texts that offer guidance for teaching for a more socially just world.

Comment /Source

Temple S. Lovelace

Dr. Temple S. Lovelace is an Associate Professor of Special Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. Her research interests include social justice and equity through a disability inquiry lens, as well as innovative classroom based instructional and intervention strategies in the areas of academic and behavior supports. With 15 years experience as an educator, she has remained committed to serving young children and supporting quality and innovative education initiatives that provide the opportunity and access all children deserve. Dr. Lovelace spearheaded the revitalization of the widely successful Fusion program, which is a partnership between Duquesne University and Center of Life, a Hazelwood-based community empowerment organization. As a graduate of The Ohio State University and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst, Dr. Lovelace's research has been focused on the principles of behavior analysis and education in urban contexts. Currently, Dr. Lovelace is focused on achieving equity for persons of color with disabilities and their families. In a partnership with The Color of Autism Foundation, Dr. Lovelace hopes to continue her community-based work using Pittsburgh and Detroit as models for how families, communities, schools and universities can work together in support of groundbreaking instruction and intervention supports for the Autism community. Research Interests "Making" and "Tinkering" as Evidenced Based Practices (rooted in STEAM & Literacy) Critical Citizenship of African American Students with Disabilities Youth Voice: Impact on Resilience, Engagement and Education Reform Culturally Responsive Behavior Interventions Teacher, Student, Community - Mediated Transformative Educational Practices (Behavior and Academic Interventions) STEAM-based learning for Females and other Underrepresented Group

''Heterogenius'' Classrooms--Behind the Scenes: Detracking Math and Science--A Look at Groupwork in Action

''Peering into science and math classrooms to bear witness to the transformative possibilities of detracking, 'Heterogenius' Classrooms offers wide-angle inspiration and explicit zoom-in on details of practice. . . . Through accessible language and detailed illustrations, these very fine educators carefully reveal the magic but also the how-to's of rigorous curricula, complex tasks, and deep classroom participation.''

--From the Foreword by Michelle Fine, Distinguished Professor of Psychology, The Graduate Center-City University of New York


''I love it. We need it. We're living through dangerous times and how we organize schooling is an essential ingredient in restoring community, providing for both a better and more equitable experience for all children. Thank you Watanabe et al.!''

--Deborah Meier, Steinhardt School of Education, New York University


''For most of the pre-service mathematics teachers I work with, designing and teaching a lesson with problems and questions that will engage untracked groups of students in rich mathematical discussion is great theory but is impossible for them to imagine in practice. 'Heterogenius' Classrooms provides just the connection they need to see. This well organized DVD provides an 'existence proof' that when teachers implement the community building methods of Complex Instruction, their students can and do engage in productive mathematical work.''

--Judith Kysh, San Francisco State University


''Professional developers struggle to find concrete examples of positive groupwork in math and science to help teachers incorporate successful strategies into their teaching. 'Heterogenius' Classrooms combines video snapshots of teachers using these strategies with explicit and clear descriptions of each strategy, how and when to use it, and why the strategy is effective. This is a powerful resource that should be a part of any professional developer's library.''

--Rebecca Smith, Co-Director, Science & Health Education Partnership (SEP), University of California, San Francisco


While researchers have documented the promise of detracking reform, many teachers still find it difficult to teach students with a wide range of academic skills in one classroom. Through engaging classroom footage and powerful interviews with teachers, students, and administrators, this 80-minute DVD showcases best practices from successful detracked math and science secondary classrooms. The companion book features the backdrop to the film, including lesson plans, student handouts, rubrics, and reflections written by featured teachers in order of their appearance in the film. Concluding chapters cover topics such as support for struggling students, professional development opportunities for teachers, and frequently asked questions about and additional resources on detracking. 

In this current high-stakes testing climate, educators must make a decision about how to address the needs of students who are not meeting grade-level expectations. Do they place these students in separate, remedial classes, or do they detrack? This resource shows that detracking--more rigor with multiple entry points and support--is the socially just and effective alternative to remediation through tracking.

Comment /Source

Temple S. Lovelace

Dr. Temple S. Lovelace is an Associate Professor of Special Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. Her research interests include social justice and equity through a disability inquiry lens, as well as innovative classroom based instructional and intervention strategies in the areas of academic and behavior supports. With 15 years experience as an educator, she has remained committed to serving young children and supporting quality and innovative education initiatives that provide the opportunity and access all children deserve. Dr. Lovelace spearheaded the revitalization of the widely successful Fusion program, which is a partnership between Duquesne University and Center of Life, a Hazelwood-based community empowerment organization. As a graduate of The Ohio State University and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst, Dr. Lovelace's research has been focused on the principles of behavior analysis and education in urban contexts. Currently, Dr. Lovelace is focused on achieving equity for persons of color with disabilities and their families. In a partnership with The Color of Autism Foundation, Dr. Lovelace hopes to continue her community-based work using Pittsburgh and Detroit as models for how families, communities, schools and universities can work together in support of groundbreaking instruction and intervention supports for the Autism community. Research Interests "Making" and "Tinkering" as Evidenced Based Practices (rooted in STEAM & Literacy) Critical Citizenship of African American Students with Disabilities Youth Voice: Impact on Resilience, Engagement and Education Reform Culturally Responsive Behavior Interventions Teacher, Student, Community - Mediated Transformative Educational Practices (Behavior and Academic Interventions) STEAM-based learning for Females and other Underrepresented Group

Revolutionizing Education: Youth Participatory Action Research in Motion

Many scholars have turned to the groundbreaking critical research methodology, Youth-Led Participatory Action Research (YPAR), as a way to address both the political challenges and inherent power imbalances of conducting research with young people. Revolutionizing Education makes an extraordinarily unique contribution to the literature on adolescents by offering a broad framework for understanding this research methodology. With an informative combination of theory and practice, this edited collection brings together student writings alongside those of major scholars in the field. While remaining sensitive to the methodological challenges of qualitative inquiry, Revolutionizing Education is the first definitive statement of YPAR as it relates to sites of education.

Comment /Source

Temple S. Lovelace

Dr. Temple S. Lovelace is an Associate Professor of Special Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. Her research interests include social justice and equity through a disability inquiry lens, as well as innovative classroom based instructional and intervention strategies in the areas of academic and behavior supports. With 15 years experience as an educator, she has remained committed to serving young children and supporting quality and innovative education initiatives that provide the opportunity and access all children deserve. Dr. Lovelace spearheaded the revitalization of the widely successful Fusion program, which is a partnership between Duquesne University and Center of Life, a Hazelwood-based community empowerment organization. As a graduate of The Ohio State University and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst, Dr. Lovelace's research has been focused on the principles of behavior analysis and education in urban contexts. Currently, Dr. Lovelace is focused on achieving equity for persons of color with disabilities and their families. In a partnership with The Color of Autism Foundation, Dr. Lovelace hopes to continue her community-based work using Pittsburgh and Detroit as models for how families, communities, schools and universities can work together in support of groundbreaking instruction and intervention supports for the Autism community. Research Interests "Making" and "Tinkering" as Evidenced Based Practices (rooted in STEAM & Literacy) Critical Citizenship of African American Students with Disabilities Youth Voice: Impact on Resilience, Engagement and Education Reform Culturally Responsive Behavior Interventions Teacher, Student, Community - Mediated Transformative Educational Practices (Behavior and Academic Interventions) STEAM-based learning for Females and other Underrepresented Group

Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice: Conversations with Educators

Mathematics as a Catalyst for Change for ALL Students.

Educators increasingly recognize the important role that mathematics teaching plays in helping students to understand and overcome social injustice and inequality. This collection of original articles is the start of a compelling conversation among some of the leading figures in critical and social justice mathematics, a number of teachers and educators who have been inspired by them and who have inspiring stories of their own to tell and any reader interested in the intersection of education and social justice. An important read for every educator, this book shows how to teach mathematics so that all students are given the tools they need to confront issues of social justice today and in the future.

Comment /Source

Temple S. Lovelace

Dr. Temple S. Lovelace is an Associate Professor of Special Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. Her research interests include social justice and equity through a disability inquiry lens, as well as innovative classroom based instructional and intervention strategies in the areas of academic and behavior supports. With 15 years experience as an educator, she has remained committed to serving young children and supporting quality and innovative education initiatives that provide the opportunity and access all children deserve. Dr. Lovelace spearheaded the revitalization of the widely successful Fusion program, which is a partnership between Duquesne University and Center of Life, a Hazelwood-based community empowerment organization. As a graduate of The Ohio State University and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst, Dr. Lovelace's research has been focused on the principles of behavior analysis and education in urban contexts. Currently, Dr. Lovelace is focused on achieving equity for persons of color with disabilities and their families. In a partnership with The Color of Autism Foundation, Dr. Lovelace hopes to continue her community-based work using Pittsburgh and Detroit as models for how families, communities, schools and universities can work together in support of groundbreaking instruction and intervention supports for the Autism community. Research Interests "Making" and "Tinkering" as Evidenced Based Practices (rooted in STEAM & Literacy) Critical Citizenship of African American Students with Disabilities Youth Voice: Impact on Resilience, Engagement and Education Reform Culturally Responsive Behavior Interventions Teacher, Student, Community - Mediated Transformative Educational Practices (Behavior and Academic Interventions) STEAM-based learning for Females and other Underrepresented Group

Interrogating Whiteness and Relinquishing Power: White Faculty's Commitment to Racial Consciousness in STEM Classrooms

Interrogating Whiteness and Relinquishing Power: White Faculty’s Commitment to Racial Consciousness in STEM Classrooms is a collection of narratives that will transform the teaching of any faculty member who teaches in the STEM system. The book links issues of inclusion to teacher excellence at all grade levels by illuminating the critical influence that racial consciousness has on the behaviors of White faculty in the classroom. It functions as an analytical tool, scaffolding exemplary examples to inspire readers to engage in the complex and difficult work of assessing their own racial consciousness and teacher effectiveness. White pre-service teachers in STEM education rarely see the importance of the link between race and the teaching and learning of mathematics, in part because the White faculty who are teaching these subjects rarely engage in the study of racial projects in STEM. From this perspective, the authors of this book contend that the classroom is a racialized environment that, if not addressed, can reproduce racial structures and hierarchies in cyclical ways.

Comment /Source

Temple S. Lovelace

Dr. Temple S. Lovelace is an Associate Professor of Special Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. Her research interests include social justice and equity through a disability inquiry lens, as well as innovative classroom based instructional and intervention strategies in the areas of academic and behavior supports. With 15 years experience as an educator, she has remained committed to serving young children and supporting quality and innovative education initiatives that provide the opportunity and access all children deserve. Dr. Lovelace spearheaded the revitalization of the widely successful Fusion program, which is a partnership between Duquesne University and Center of Life, a Hazelwood-based community empowerment organization. As a graduate of The Ohio State University and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst, Dr. Lovelace's research has been focused on the principles of behavior analysis and education in urban contexts. Currently, Dr. Lovelace is focused on achieving equity for persons of color with disabilities and their families. In a partnership with The Color of Autism Foundation, Dr. Lovelace hopes to continue her community-based work using Pittsburgh and Detroit as models for how families, communities, schools and universities can work together in support of groundbreaking instruction and intervention supports for the Autism community. Research Interests "Making" and "Tinkering" as Evidenced Based Practices (rooted in STEAM & Literacy) Critical Citizenship of African American Students with Disabilities Youth Voice: Impact on Resilience, Engagement and Education Reform Culturally Responsive Behavior Interventions Teacher, Student, Community - Mediated Transformative Educational Practices (Behavior and Academic Interventions) STEAM-based learning for Females and other Underrepresented Group

Participatory Culture in a Networked Era: A Conversation on Youth, Learning, Commerce, and Politics

In the last two decades, both the conception and the practice of participatory culture have been transformed by the new affordances enabled by digital, networked, and mobile technologies. This exciting new book explores that transformation by bringing together three leading figures in conversation. Jenkins, Ito and boyd examine the ways in which our personal and professional lives are shaped by experiences interacting with and around emerging media.

Stressing the social and cultural contexts of participation, the authors describe the process of diversification and mainstreaming that has transformed participatory culture. They advocate a move beyond individualized personal expression and argue for an ethos of “doing it together” in addition to “doing it yourself.”

Participatory Culture in a Networked Era will interest students and scholars of digital media and their impact on society and will engage readers in a broader dialogue and conversation about their own participatory practices in this digital age.

Comment

Temple S. Lovelace

Dr. Temple S. Lovelace is an Associate Professor of Special Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. Her research interests include social justice and equity through a disability inquiry lens, as well as innovative classroom based instructional and intervention strategies in the areas of academic and behavior supports. With 15 years experience as an educator, she has remained committed to serving young children and supporting quality and innovative education initiatives that provide the opportunity and access all children deserve. Dr. Lovelace spearheaded the revitalization of the widely successful Fusion program, which is a partnership between Duquesne University and Center of Life, a Hazelwood-based community empowerment organization. As a graduate of The Ohio State University and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst, Dr. Lovelace's research has been focused on the principles of behavior analysis and education in urban contexts. Currently, Dr. Lovelace is focused on achieving equity for persons of color with disabilities and their families. In a partnership with The Color of Autism Foundation, Dr. Lovelace hopes to continue her community-based work using Pittsburgh and Detroit as models for how families, communities, schools and universities can work together in support of groundbreaking instruction and intervention supports for the Autism community. Research Interests "Making" and "Tinkering" as Evidenced Based Practices (rooted in STEAM & Literacy) Critical Citizenship of African American Students with Disabilities Youth Voice: Impact on Resilience, Engagement and Education Reform Culturally Responsive Behavior Interventions Teacher, Student, Community - Mediated Transformative Educational Practices (Behavior and Academic Interventions) STEAM-based learning for Females and other Underrepresented Group