Temple S. Lovelace, Ph.D., BCBA-D

 

Temple S. Lovelace, Ph.D., BCBA-D is an Associate Professor of Special Education at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, PA. Her research centers on the examination of the intersectionality of disability and race, with particular interest in creating and sustaining innovative, culturally-responsive academic and behavioral interventions.  Temple is a member of the Remake Learning Council, a commission of distinguished leaders from education, government, business and civic sectors in greater Pittsburgh. During her tenure in Pittsburgh, PA, Temple has worked to provide programs that support the voices of youth, teachers, and families in Allegheny County. As the creator of Youth Leading Change, a program that supports the elevation of youth as participants in their educational lives, Temple works to create youth-led, teacher-powered educational spaces where youth can find opportunities to instigate – knowing that they have the power to upset.disrupt.ignite.transform.  

Commitment to educational spaces where all students and teachers have membership is a chief concern for Temple. Over the last eight years, her work with teachers and families through Teachers Leading Change (TLC) and Fusion has been chiefly focused to repairing relationships and reducing the trauma that is felt in many educational contexts. Now in its third year, TLC is an incubator that supports a teacher’s innovation and implementation of classroom-based projects that provide equitable experiences for African American students and students situated in poverty. Teachers Leading Change provided the opportunity for teachers to launch innovations such as Sisters e S.T.E.A.M. In partnership with Center of Life, she spearheaded the revitalization of Fusion, an out of school time program in the Hazelwood area of Pittsburgh that focuses on academic intervention and STEAM learning.

As a graduate of The Ohio State University and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst, Temple’s research has been focused on the principles of behavior analysis and education in urban contexts.  Temple has authored several articles and book chapters. Her work with Teachers Leading Change is reflective of two chapters entitled Achieving Educational Equity for African American Students with and without Exceptionalities and Creating a Schoolwide Culture to Support Practitioner Research

Temple started her career as an early childhood interventionist, with PreK – 4 special education teacher certification. As an educator, she has worked in a variety of public school formats. In addition, she served as an advocate and oversaw the home-school connection for many families receiving educational and behavioral support services in Western Michigan. 


RENEE KNOX, ED.D. 

Educator and Community Advocate

Dr. Renee Knox is an educator who is also a lifelong learner.  Throughout her career she has enthusiastically worked with teens and adults in the areas of reading, academic strategies and professional development.  She is a native of Pittsburgh, PA but her travels across the country and to the Caribbean and Africa has informed her research in the areas of women’s and social justice issues.  Her works, accomplishments and community involvements are numerous, but her commitment to advocacy and family is where her passion lies.


LIZ MCBRIDE

Graduate Assistant; Education Uncontained

Liz McBride is a native of Youngstown, OH. She is a 2014 graduate of Saint Mary’s College, where she earned her Bachelor’s degree in Art History and Psychology. Currently, she is in the Clinical Mental Health Counseling program at Duquesne University of the Holy Spirit. Liz likes a lot of things: alliteration; Pop culture; social justice; mindfulness meditation; spinning; a good meal with good friends; making lists; reading; and acronyms. (Just a name a few.)


VENNEASHA DAVIS, M.ED.

IncubatED; Founder of Sisters e STEAM

Venneasha is an elementary teacher for Pittsburgh Public Schools. She currently has a B.A. In Elementary Education from Point Park University and holds a dual Master’s Degree in Middle School Science and Curriculum and Instruction from Walden University. She works at the Woodland Hills Academy teaching Science and Language Arts. Venneasha is also the Founder and Facilitator of Sisters e S.T.E.A.M. which is an after school program focusing on science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics seeks to empower the African American female or the female student situated in poverty.  Her mission is to expose these girls to inquiry based hands-on science, which incorporates real world applications. Venneasha’s research is primarily concerned with academic achievement of youth in urban schools. Her work is centered on creating units that blend multiple learning styles.  She is committed to the importance of providing teachers with the skills and knowledge to convert traditional content into lessons that incorporate active learning. Venneasha is also one of 2014-2015 “UNBOXED” teachers in Allegheny County.